Voting Information

VOTE MAY 3, 2022

The Franklin Township Community School Corporation facility referendum will be held May 3, 2022. 

Registration

Voter registration deadline is April 4. Register online here

Absentee Voting

Absentee voting period begins April 5 and concludes May 2. You may be eligible to vote by mail. Absentee voting information is here


Absentee In-Person Voting

City County Building

200 E. Washington Street, Indianapolis

Weekdays:

April 5 through 22: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

April 25-29: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Monday, May 2: 8 a.m. to Noon

Weekends:

April 23 and 24: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

April 30 and May 1: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Franklin Township Government Center

6231 S. Arlington Ave.

Indianapolis, IN 46237

Early voting:

Weekdays

April 25-29: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Weekends:

April 23-24: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

April 30, May 1: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.


Election Day Voting in Franklin Township: Polls are open from 6AM to 6PM

Acton United Methodist Church

5650 Senour Road

Indianapolis

Election Day Only

6 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Franklin Central Christian Church

4100 S. Franklin Road

Indianapolis

Election Day Only

6 a.m. to 6 p.m.

The Creek Church

6430 S. Franklin Road

Indianapolis

Election Day Only

6 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Lutheran High School

5555 S. Arlington Ave.

Indianapolis

Election Day Only

6 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Franklin Township Government Center (Also offers early voting April 23 through May 1)

6231 S. Arlington Ave.

Indianapolis

6 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Election Day


Find Your Polling Place

https://indianavoters.in.gov/

Additional Voting Details Available

www.in.gov/sos/elections/voter-information 

BALLOT QUESTION

Please read this ballot question language carefully, and the explanation of the language below it. The ballot language has many elements required by state law that may seem confusing, so the explanation is important to read.

“Shall Franklin Township Community School Corporation increase property taxes paid to the school corporation by homeowners and businesses? If this public question is approved by the voters, the average property tax paid to the school corporation per year on a residence would increase by 24% and the average property tax paid to the school corporation per year on a business property would increase by 16%. The political subdivision may issue bonds or enter into a lease to complete the 2022 Safety, Security, Capacity and Improvement Project, consisting of the renovation and expansion of Franklin Central High School, maintenance and repairs to school facilities including site improvements, and the purchase of equipment and technology, which is estimated to cost $98,485,000 over 22 years. The most recent property tax referendum within the boundaries of the political subdivision for which this public question is being considered was proposed by Franklin Township Community School Corporation in 2011 and failed.”

EXPLANATION OF BALLOT QUESTION LANGUAGE

Does this mean that my home property tax bill would increase by 24 percent?

No. It does not. The Indiana state legislature mandates this specific ballot language, but the language – especially the percentage cited – substantially overstates the impact of a “yes” vote on both business and homeowner property taxes. For most homeowners, the actual impact on the overall property tax bill would range between 10 and 11 percent.

Why would the actual increase be lower than stated on the ballot question?

For several reasons. For one, the 24 percent applies only to the school corporation portion of a property tax bill and not to the property tax bill in its entirety, which includes other taxing units.

Are there other factors that make the ballot language inaccurate or incomplete?

Yes; several other factors. For one, the ballot language does not take into account the standard homestead deduction, which decreases the taxable value of any home. The standard homestead deduction is either 60% of your property’s assessed value or a maximum of $45,000, whichever is less. 

What other factors go into a lower increase?

The ballot language does not take into account an Indiana property tax replacement credit, a deduction of up to $2,500 of the Indiana property taxes paid on a resident’s principal place of residence. 

Are there other factors for some individuals?

Yes. For instance, the ballot language also does not take into account any supplemental tax reductions – such as mortgage deductions or over-65 or Disabled Veteran or Surviving Spouse deductions – which further decreases the taxable value of some homes.

What would the actual dollars-and-cents effect of the referendum be on homeowners’ property tax bills?

For a home with the Marion County median value of $185,700, the monthly cost would be $15.47. Median value means that half of all homes in the county have a higher value and half have a lower value.

For a home with the Marion County mean value of $211,800, the monthly cost would be $18.44. The mean value is calculated by adding the value of all Marion County homes and dividing by the number of homes.

Didn’t referendum questions at one time include rates rather than percentages?

Yes. In this case, the Board is asking voters to approve a property tax increase of $0.2099 per $100 of net assessed value, which would be the lowest referendum of any Marion County school district that currently has a referendum. To date, FTCSC is the only district within the county that has not received referendum revenue.

What does the 2011 referendum have to do with this referendum?

There is no connection. This, too, is ballot language mandated by state legislators.

(This article updated 4/21/22)